Third Grade

Third Grade Teachers

Mrs. Tammy Boone
tboone@iss.k12.nc.us

Ms. Lauren Dorman
lauren_dorman@iss.k12.nc.us

Mrs. Molly Ford
molly_ford@iss.k12.nc.us

Mrs. Lori Seabolt
lori_seabolt@iss.k12.nc.us

Classroom Schedules

Teacher - Mrs. Tammy Boone

7:30-7:40 - LNE TV
7:40-9:40 - ELA
9:40-11:20 - Math
11:25-12:15 - Enhancements
12:20-12:50 - Lunch
12:55-1:20 - Recess
1:20-1:35 - Number Talks
1:35-2:15 - Science & Social Studies
2:15-2:20 - Pack Up & Dismissal

Teacher - Ms. Lauren Dorman

7:30-7:40 - LNE TV
7:40-9:40 - ELA
9:40-11:20 - Math
11:25-12:15 - Enhancements
12:20-12:50 - Lunch
12:55-1:20 - Recess
1:20-1:35 - Number Talks
1:35-2:15 - Science & Social Studies
2:15-2:20 - Pack Up & Dismissal

Teacher - Mrs. Molly Ford

7:30-7:40 - LNE TV
7:40-9:40 - ELA
9:40-11:20 - Math
11:25-12:15 - Enhancements
12:20-12:50 - Lunch
12:55-1:20 - Recess
1:20-1:35 - Number Talks
1:35-2:15 - Science & Social Studies
2:15-2:20 - Pack Up & Dismissal

Teacher - Mrs. Lori Seabolt

7:30-7:40 - LNE TV
7:40-9:40 - ELA
9:40-11:20 - Math
11:25-12:15 - Enhancements
12:20-12:50 - Lunch
12:55-1:20 - Recess
1:20-1:35 - Number Talks
1:35-2:15 - Science & Social Studies
2:15-2:20 - Pack Up & Dismissal

Newsletters

Homework

Reading: Read 20 minutes daily

Math: Practice math facts for 10 minutes daily

Spelling: Practice spelling words daily

Vocabulary: Practice vocabulary words daily

The most important homework for third graders is reading at least 20 minutes every weeknight and at least 40 minutes on the weekend.  The weekend reading can be done all at once or in two or more chunks.  All reading should be recorded on the student's reading record. Many third graders still need to practice their reading fluency (reading with appropriate speed, accuracy, and proper expression) and will benefit from reading aloud to a parent, sibling or pet for 5-10 minutes of the total reading.  Reading the same passage 3 times (or until fluent) can be especially helpful.  The remainder of the reading should be silent reading.  Parents may support their children's silent reading by asking 1-2 comprehension questions.  If the child does not understand what he/she read, it would be helpful to back up and re-read to a parent and discuss what was read. If your child still cannot understand after reading the same passage twice, the text may be too difficult.  If your child needs help determining what is a "just right" book for him/her, please reach out to your child's teacher if you have any questions.  

Even older children enjoy and benefit highly from having a parent read aloud.  Reading aloud to children is such an incredible bonding experience.  In addition, the parent is modelling a love of reading, is demonstrating how to read fluently and is giving the child the opportunity to strengthen comprehension skills. Reading aloud to your child should supplement (not replace) your child's own assigned reading.  

In addition to reading, students will have 5-10 minutes of Word Work/Spelling homework, 5-10 minutes of Vocabulary Homework, and 5-10 minutes of Math homework each evening. An occasional long-term project will be assigned.  If your child is habitually spending more than one focused hour completing homework (including reading), please contact your child's teacher.  

Student Resources

Math Websites

Khan Academy                                Ten Marks       

Reflex Math                                     Sumdog           

Math-a-Rama                                   Math Playground       

Adapted Mind                                  Primary Math Games     

Greg Tang                                        Study Jams-Math 

Sheppards Software Math                Math Time Activities 

Reading Websites

Fun Brain - 3rd Grade                      ABCYa - 3rd Grade

Book Adventure                               Adapted Mind

Storyline Online                               Road to Grammar Jr.

Alpha-Bot Spelling                          Spelling City

Big Universe                                    True Flix

Flocabulary

Science - Social Studies

Brain Pop Jr.                                    Brain Pop

National Geographic Kids               Animal Planet

Zoo Books                                       NASA Kids Club

Discovery Kids                                Weather Wiz Kids

Time for Kids                                  Kids Health

General Interest

Dance Mat Typing 

 

Reading & Math:

www.spellingcity.com

AR Link

www.raz-kids.com/main/Login  

www.readinga-z.com

www.readwritethink.org

www.quia.com/rr/332704.html

www.easycbm.com

Math:

http://www.mobymax.com/

https://learnzillion.com/

 http://www.thinkingblocks.com/

http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/

www.mathfactcafe.com

www.mathslice.com

www.Aplusmath.com

www.coolmath4kids.com

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/SuperStars/superstars.htm

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/ConeCrazy.htm

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/KnightsOfMath.htm

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/CarWash.htm

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/Moles.htm

http://www.multiplication.com/flashgames/JungleJim.htm

http://www.fi.edu/time/Journey/JustInTime/contents.html

www.brainpopjr.com

http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com

http://www.ixl.com/

Science:

www.fossweb.com

www.calculatorcat.com

http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/vphase.html.

www.brainpop.com

www.worldbookonline.com

EOG Practice

http://wendelles.wcpss.net/eog.htm

www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/eog/sampleitems

Social Studies:

www.timetoast.com

Native American Websites

http://www.mce.k12tn.net/indians/navigation/native_american_territories.htm

http://www2.needham.k12.ma.us/eliot/technology/lessons/na_regions/index.htm

http://www.mrnussbaum.com/nativeamericans.htm

http://www.mrdonn.org/nativeamericans.html

http://www.marilee.us/nativeamericans.html

http://www.mce.k12tn.net/indians/navigation/native_american_chart.htm

Quizlet

 

3rd Grade Book Report Information

Book Report Information

1. Students should choose a book that is a good fit book for them to read. This should connect with their Read to Self book.  If students are concerned they may not finish their book in time, they should meet with their teacher to discuss options.

2. Students have lots of flexibility with the different styles of project. They can choose any of the options, and if they want to do something that is not listed, have them talk with their teacher to make sure with will meet all of the requirements.  

3.  Please look over the Rubric with your child.  This is the sheet that teachers will use to grade the finished projects when they are presented.  Students should write one paragraph for each of the following: Setting, Characters, Beginning, Middle, and End.  If there is not room on their project to put those paragraphs, they can write them on separate paper and turn them in with their projects. 

Book Report Rubric 

Book Report Ideas! 

1. Foldable Report
Create any kind of paper foldable (flipbook, mini-book, etc.) that shows each story element (setting, character, beginning, middle, and end)  described.  You can be as creative as you'd like! 

2. Tri-Fold Report
https://reliefteachingideas.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/simple-book-review-pamphlet/

3. Lapbook Report
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/195414071307308937/
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/195414071307672596/ 

4. Shoe Box Diorama
https://www.pinterest.com/fawyndra/book-report-diorama-examples/ 

5. i-Movie Trailer
Most ipad devices have an app called iMovie.  Students can use this app to create a "trailer" book report.  If you google "iMovie book reports" you can see some different clips and ideas.   Students should save the iMovie onto a flash drive or email it to me.

6. Flower Report
This is an example of a flower report.  You could use this template but would need to change the headings to represent the story elements (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end).  Instead of using the template, you could type or write each element onto notebook paper and glue them together creatively to make a flower report. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/195414071307674270/ 

7. Rocket Report
This site has a cute template you can download to use for your rocket report.  You can change your 'headings" to represent each story element (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end) https://reliefteachingideas.wordpress.com/2013/07/27/reading-across-the-universe-book-report/ 

8. Cereal Box Book Report
Cover an empty cereal box with white or colorful paper.  Draw a picture to represent your book on the front of the box.  Using the sides and back of the box, display written or typed descriptions of each story element (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and ending).  You can also include more illustrations to represent your book.

9. Paper Bag Report
Find 4-5 items that represent your story and put them inside a paper bag.  Decorate the front of the paper bag with a picture to represent your book.  You can include the story elements (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end) in any creative way.  Some examples are to type descriptions of each element and glue them onto the back and/or sides of the paper bag or to incorporate them into the items you place into the bag. 

10.  PowerPoint Book Report
Create a powerpoint slideshow to represent your book. Create a title page slide and  slides to represent each story element (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end).  You can also create slides to describe your favorite parts and/or to add pictures that represent the book.

11.  Book Poster
Use a piece of poster paper to create a poster to display all of the story elements (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end).  Be creative and draw or glue on pictures to represent the book.

12. Book Board Game
Create a board game to represent your book.  You can be as creative as you'd like as long as you have all the important story elements incorporated into your game. 

13.  “Book Fair” Project
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/195414071307672593/
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/195414071307672564/ 

14.  Book Collage
This is similar to a book poster but with more of a "collage" style.  You can cut out words/phrases/pictures from magazines or clip art that represent your book.  You can arrange your collage as creatively as you'd like as long as each story element is included.

15.  “In the News” Book Report
Write a news article to advertise or describe your book.  Be sure to include all important story elements. 

16.  Amazon Book Review
Write a review of your book and include all the important story elements (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end).  Just like any other book review rate your book with 1-5 stars and explain why you think the book deserves this rating. 

17. Illustration Book Report
Create an illustration to represent each story element (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end).  Create an illustration for the title of the book as well.  Bind your illustrations together to create a book or put them into a folder.  You can be creative too! For example,  you could attach each illustration in a "flip book" style.   

18. Book Summary
Type up a summary of your book.  Make sure you include your name and the book's title.  Include information about all of the story elements (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end) in your summary.

19. Book Mobile
Using a coat hanger and other creative materials, create a 3D mobile to represent your book.  

20.  Comic Strip Book Report
Create a comic strip to represent each important story element. 

Parent Resources

Read to Achieve Information